Info

Living Free in Tennessee - Nicole Sauce

Homesteading, food, freedom and fun!
RSS Feed
Living Free in Tennessee - Nicole Sauce
2024
February
January


2023
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2022
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2021
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2020
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2019
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2018
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2017
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2016
December
November
October
July
June
May
April


Categories

All Episodes
Archives
Categories
Now displaying: Page 1
Aug 21, 2023

Today, we will talk about the content creating homesteaders that are kicking butt and taking names, and what that feels like.

Featured Event: August 24 at 6pm: Spokane Washington Meetup: https://www.livingfreeintennessee.com/event/spokane-washington-meetup-2/

Sponsor 1: DiscountMylarBags.com: https://bit.ly/43r4dkx

Sponsor 2: Freesteading.com: https://bit.ly/3o2BcMR

Tales from the Prepper Pantry

  • 1st Cheddar is aging
  • Focused un using all the bits and bobs from the freezer that have long been there
  • 7 gallons of tomatoes in the freezer ready to process
  • No canning was completed this week, instead we fed the neighbors for a Holler Neighbor Campfire Night
  • New Green Bean Recipe - Grumpy Acres Calls The Cowboy Green Beans

Weekly Shopping Report from Joe

Our main shopping trip was Sunday rather than Saturday, as on Saturday one of the trips included a gun show at the Knoxville Expo Center. There, I found a few items, including a tourniquet, some small freedom seeds, and a garden implement for planting them.

Dollar Tree was a usual stop. The cooler containing the Venom I prefer is still down, so my drink was room temperature; oh well. Stock levels in the other coolers are still mostly good, with all at least half full, and some full. There were a lot of drinks on the shelves as well.

Home Depot had at least two visits. The price of a 2x4x8 has taken a pretty big jump, back up to $3.68.

As usual we got our groceries at Aldi. They do not have any of the 70% chocolate I prefer, nor the 85% alternative. Staple prices were:

Eggs: $1.06; whole milk: $2.86; heavy cream: $4.69; butter: $3.19; bacon (1 lb. low sodium): $3.99; OJ: $3.19; sugar: $3.69; flour: $2.19.

A gallon of untainted regular gasoline remains at $3.899.

Frugality Tip: Send yours in

Operation Independence

  • Subpanel is moved for the Cabin Solar so that final automation can be completed
  • Heating water with the sun
  • Starting Sept 1, changing how we track homestead finances

Main topic of the Show: Failing Homesteaders From The Internet

The world of content creation has been rapidly growing in the homesteader and hobby farm sectors. You notice that?

Over the past few weeks, I noticed something interesting about fellow homesteaders on the Internet who are kicking butt. Most of the don’t realize it.

You see, there is this constant feeling that things are undone on a homestead and that is amplified when you are also working a job, or doing content creation which is like a whole other job.

That said, there are lots of homesteaders who are just plain showing the world that they are kicking ass. But when you get to know them, they are worried about the same things.

Then there are the homesteaders who are making great films but not actually doing the work. We’ve seen a few scandals in that regard of “Off Grid” folks living in the city but filing on their off grid locations.

So why am I bringing this up? It is because someone embarrassed me the other day. They said nice things about my homestead and what we are able together done here, while also making this podcast and shooting some video. All I could think of what hose cluttered my living room is right now, how behind I am on the remodel, and how crappy the quality of my videos is. I aspire to make these cool tutorials, then end up just shooting something as fast as I can and getting it out there so that SOMETHING is done. 

Then I spoke with another friend who is newer to homesteading who was feeling like he hadn’t reached his stride yet because after a year, he had only done the following things <Insert an impressive list of stuff here>. He could not see how much he HAD DONE.

I started reaching out to other content creators who I know who seem to be doing awesome things and started hearing similar perspectives. They see what other homesteaders are doing, race to take care of everything while creating content that they feel is  not good enough, constantly behind, etc.

<CHEESE STORY>

Guys, what gives? What if we are the problem? What if we are undermining ourselves with these perspectives?

* You are the story you tell yourself, so make it a good one

* Maybe people like to see real content that may to be top quality editing

* Let’s face it, You don’t make much money as a content creator - Youtube is definitely NOT paying the bills so we all have to get creative on that front

* Every time we waste a thought on feeling inadequate, we miss an opportunity to show someone how to do something they did not now how to do. Homesteading is a never-ending learning experience, you know more than you think you know

* Most homesteaders are in fact bad asses. Bas asses who will jump in to save a hurt chicken or lamb. Bad asses who will hand pick cabbage worms off their plants to avoid insecticide. Bad asses who have figured out how to look at a pile of produce from the garden and pit it together into a tasty meal. Bad asses who can make 14000 egg dished because there is always a time when you have too mane. Bad asses who have had to look at remorse and feel the guilt when an animal in your care died because of you either not knowing what to do, or accidentally creating a situation that was unsafe for the animal, or it just died and you somehow think it is your fault. 

* We are fearless.

* We are not afraid to start something we know nothing about

* We are relentless and don’t give up

* We jump into things that other folks would never do and are more resilient because of it

But most of all, we have something most of the world does not: a true connection to nature, the cycles of life, and to God - however you define God. We are living in a way that is more grounded in the world and nature than most in modern society and because of this, we feel humble.

And I think this is why, when folks say something nice about what we do, we stammer, look around guiltily, and feel like they should be talking to someone else.

But what will change if we instead do this - say Thank you! I’ve worked hard to get where I am and often feel like I have not done enough and it is really nice to hear someone say that to me.

And what if we start telling each other more proactively when we see some homesteading kickassery?

What would that feel like? How could that change our worlds?

Just food for thought as we go into this hot week in August.

Make it a Great Week

GUYS! Don’t forget about the cookbook, Cook With What You Have by Nicole Sauce and Mama Sauce. 

Community

Resources

Today, we will talk about the content creating homesteaders that are kicking butt and taking names, and what that feels like.

Featured Event: August 24 at 6pm: Spokane Washington Meetup: https://www.livingfreeintennessee.com/event/spokane-washington-meetup-2/

Sponsor 1: DiscountMylarBags.com: https://bit.ly/43r4dkx

Sponsor 2: Freesteading.com: https://bit.ly/3o2BcMR

Tales from the Prepper Pantry

  • 1st Cheddar is aging
  • Focused un using all the bits and bobs from the freezer that have long been there
  • 7 gallons of tomatoes in the freezer ready to process
  • No canning was completed this week, instead we fed the neighbors for a Holler Neighbor Campfire Night
  • New Green Bean Recipe - Grumpy Acres Calls The Cowboy Green Beans

Weekly Shopping Report from Joe

Our main shopping trip was Sunday rather than Saturday, as on Saturday one of the trips included a gun show at the Knoxville Expo Center. There, I found a few items, including a tourniquet, some small freedom seeds, and a garden implement for planting them.

Dollar Tree was a usual stop. The cooler containing the Venom I prefer is still down, so my drink was room temperature; oh well. Stock levels in the other coolers are still mostly good, with all at least half full, and some full. There were a lot of drinks on the shelves as well.

Home Depot had at least two visits. The price of a 2x4x8 has taken a pretty big jump, back up to $3.68.

As usual we got our groceries at Aldi. They do not have any of the 70% chocolate I prefer, nor the 85% alternative. Staple prices were:

Eggs: $1.06; whole milk: $2.86; heavy cream: $4.69; butter: $3.19; bacon (1 lb. low sodium): $3.99; OJ: $3.19; sugar: $3.69; flour: $2.19.

A gallon of untainted regular gasoline remains at $3.899.

Frugality Tip: Send yours in

Operation Independence

  • Subpanel is moved for the Cabin Solar so that final automation can be completed
  • Heating water with the sun
  • Starting Sept 1, changing how we track homestead finances

Main topic of the Show: Failing Homesteaders From The Internet

The world of content creation has been rapidly growing in the homesteader and hobby farm sectors. You notice that?

Over the past few weeks, I noticed something interesting about fellow homesteaders on the Internet who are kicking butt. Most of the don’t realize it.

You see, there is this constant feeling that things are undone on a homestead and that is amplified when you are also working a job, or doing content creation which is like a whole other job.

That said, there are lots of homesteaders who are just plain showing the world that they are kicking ass. But when you get to know them, they are worried about the same things.

Then there are the homesteaders who are making great films but not actually doing the work. We’ve seen a few scandals in that regard of “Off Grid” folks living in the city but filing on their off grid locations.

So why am I bringing this up? It is because someone embarrassed me the other day. They said nice things about my homestead and what we are able together done here, while also making this podcast and shooting some video. All I could think of what hose cluttered my living room is right now, how behind I am on the remodel, and how crappy the quality of my videos is. I aspire to make these cool tutorials, then end up just shooting something as fast as I can and getting it out there so that SOMETHING is done. 

Then I spoke with another friend who is newer to homesteading who was feeling like he hadn’t reached his stride yet because after a year, he had only done the following things <Insert an impressive list of stuff here>. He could not see how much he HAD DONE.

I started reaching out to other content creators who I know who seem to be doing awesome things and started hearing similar perspectives. They see what other homesteaders are doing, race to take care of everything while creating content that they feel is  not good enough, constantly behind, etc.

<CHEESE STORY>

Guys, what gives? What if we are the problem? What if we are undermining ourselves with these perspectives?

* You are the story you tell yourself, so make it a good one

* Maybe people like to see real content that may to be top quality editing

* Let’s face it, You don’t make much money as a content creator - Youtube is definitely NOT paying the bills so we all have to get creative on that front

* Every time we waste a thought on feeling inadequate, we miss an opportunity to show someone how to do something they did not now how to do. Homesteading is a never-ending learning experience, you know more than you think you know

* Most homesteaders are in fact bad asses. Bas asses who will jump in to save a hurt chicken or lamb. Bad asses who will hand pick cabbage worms off their plants to avoid insecticide. Bad asses who have figured out how to look at a pile of produce from the garden and pit it together into a tasty meal. Bad asses who can make 14000 egg dished because there is always a time when you have too mane. Bad asses who have had to look at remorse and feel the guilt when an animal in your care died because of you either not knowing what to do, or accidentally creating a situation that was unsafe for the animal, or it just died and you somehow think it is your fault. 

* We are fearless.

* We are not afraid to start something we know nothing about

* We are relentless and don’t give up

* We jump into things that other folks would never do and are more resilient because of it

But most of all, we have something most of the world does not: a true connection to nature, the cycles of life, and to God - however you define God. We are living in a way that is more grounded in the world and nature than most in modern society and because of this, we feel humble.

And I think this is why, when folks say something nice about what we do, we stammer, look around guiltily, and feel like they should be talking to someone else.

But what will change if we instead do this - say Thank you! I’ve worked hard to get where I am and often feel like I have not done enough and it is really nice to hear someone say that to me.

And what if we start telling each other more proactively when we see some homesteading kickassery?

What would that feel like? How could that change our worlds?

Just food for thought as we go into this hot week in August.

Make it a Great Week

GUYS! Don’t forget about the cookbook, Cook With What You Have by Nicole Sauce and Mama Sauce. 

Community

Resources

0 Comments
Adding comments is not available at this time.